We advocate for people, not problems.

It is easy to view DR Congo as a colossal problem that needs to be solved. Outsiders often organize specific aid projects to solve a particular problem, and later find that they followed a misguiding principle. Sometimes the aid was not received as planned. Other times the project imposed changes that the affected people did not want. Once in a while, the project even caused harm by disempowering people and fostering dependence.

We think the key to turning this trend is to focus on supporting Congo's people, not deciding how to solve its problems. Those decisions must be made by the people who live in DR Congo.

 

We advocate to you.

Our partners are doing phenomenal work, but they are relatively isolated. This makes it hard to connect with helpful people in Congo and abroad. We build bridges between our partners and potential donors, and we try to translate events in their lives to you -- a person interested in learning about DR Congo and finding ways to help.

We advocate to helpful people and non-profits.

ACT for Congo is not just a funding organization. We are bridge builders. We connect our partners with other organizations, in Congo and abroad. This builds capacity for all involved, as they share complimentary skills and resources. It helps them network and build their international credibility. We work closely and actively with them and stand behind their competence and effectiveness.

We advocate for our partners.

We make sure that our partners are primary stakeholders when we help them connect with other organizations. They are our peers and colleagues. It is crucial that they have a seat at the negotiating table. They lead the discussion. Without ownership, there is no long term change -- only dependence. We make sure their voice is heard and needs are respected.

(l-r) ACT for Congo Executive Director Judy Anderson, HOLD-DRC Program Manager Modestine Etoy, and Seattle University Professor Serena Cosgrove.  

(l-r) ACT for Congo Executive Director Judy Anderson, HOLD-DRC Program Manager Modestine Etoy, and Seattle University Professor Serena Cosgrove.